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The Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice Project: Some Thoughts on Outreach, Partnership, and Policy

Ajay Heble, Ellen Waterman

Published: 2010-01-07

ARTICLE: This talk, given at the Canadian New Music Network Forum in Halifax in January 2010, gives an overview of the scope, context, and research goals of the Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice project.ARTICLE: This talk, given at the Canadian New Music Network Forum in Halifax in January 2010, gives an overview of the scope, context, and research goals of the Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice project. It gives particular emphasis to the way improvisation, as a social practice, relates to issues of diversity. ATTACHMENT: List of ICASP project partners, 2010.

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Improvisation implies a deep connection between the personal and the communal, self and world. A “good” improviser successfully navigates musical and institutional boundaries and the desire for self-expression, pleasing not only herself but the listener as well.

– Rob Wallace