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Improvisation, Law, and Justice Coordinator, Co-investigator

McGill University

Dr. Lametti teaches and writes in the areas of civil and common law property, intellectual property, and legal theory. His work to date has attempted to understand the parameters of traditional and intellectual resources in analytic terms, linking them to their underlying justifications and ethical goals. His most recent representative publications are “The Concept of Property: Relations through Objects of Social Wealth,” found in the University of Toronto Law Journal (2003), and “Coming to Terms with Copyright,” in a collection published by Irwin Law (2005). He is the director of research of the Centre for Intellectual Property Policy. Dr. Lametti obtained a BA in economics and political science (University of Toronto) and common and civil law degrees (McGill University). He received an LL.M. from the Yale Law School, and a doctorate in law at Oxford University; his thesis was entitled "Ethical Aspects of the Theory and Practice of Private Property". He was a clerk to Justice Peter Cory of the Supreme Court of Canada in 1989-90.

So one of the things that improvisation has come to mean in the context of highly technological performance is that improvisation is the last claim to the legitimate presence of a human in the performance of music.

– Bob Ostertag